• Events Calendar
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    Carolyn Simpson

    President

    Individual Member

    425.890.2239

  • Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce our Annual Gala event on November 18, 2016 at the Casino Ballroom was an incredible success!

     

     

  • Carolyn Simpson

    President

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    Hot Deals

     

    Job Postings

     

  • 2016 Chamber Sponsors

    Platinum

    Snoqualmie Casino

    Snoqualmie Ridge IGA

    Snoqualmie Valley YMCA 

    Waste Management

    Snoqualmie Valley Record

    Gold

    Brown & Sterling P.S.

    Silver

    Carriage Insurance Agency

    Heritage Bank

    Keep It Local Snoqualmie Valley

    Pyramid Brewery

    Sno Falls Credit Union

    Snoqualmie Valley Women In Business

    State Representative Jay Rodne

    Tanner Electric

    Bronze

    Hauglie Insurance

    Mumma Associates Insurance

    North Bend Ace Hardware

    Snoqualmie Physical Therapy

    South Fork Geosciences, PLL

     

  • Check out one of our Gala Auction Items: Ezulwini Game Lodge South Africa Package
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  • Snoqualmie Tribe

     

    The Snoqualmie Tribe—sduk ∑albix ∑ in the Native language—consists of a group of Native American peoples from the Puget Sound region of Washington state. The Snoqualmie Tribe is made up of approximately 650 members.

    The Snoqualmie Tribe has lived in the Puget Sound region since time immemorial. Long before the early explorers came to the Pacific Northwest, the Snoqualmie people hunted deer and elk, fished for salmon, and gathered berries and wild plants for food and medicine. Today, many of their members live in the communities of Snoqualmie, North Bend, Fall City, Carnation, Issaquah, Mercer Island and Monroe.

    The Tribe was a signatory of the Point Elliott Treaty with the Washington territory in 1855. At that time, they were one of the largest tribes in the Puget Sound region totaling around 4,000. They lost federal recognition in 1953, but after much battle, regained recognition in October 1999 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

    With federal recognition, they were able to develop the Snoqualmie Casino, which helps to financially support services for tribal members and the local community.

    The Snoqualmie Tribe is governed by an elected Council and their Tribal Constitution.

     

    For more information on the Snoqualmie Tribe, visit their website.