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    Lakes

     

    Langlois Lake
    About five miles north of Fall City, Langlois Lake is a small lake.  Open for fishing from the end of April to October, the lake has a boat launch and restrooms making it a perfect place to visit.  Motor boats are not allowed on the lake, so please keep that in mind when visiting. 

    Lake Alice
    Located between Preston and Fall City, Lake Alice is stocked with a mixed species of fish, especially trout.  The lake has a public access parking and a boat ramp if you are also interested in fishing from the water. 

    Rattlesnake Lake
    Located southeast of North Bend, Rattlesnake Lake is quick and easy to get to.  Fishing is allowed year-round, but is catch and release and Washington State selective gear rules apply.  You can fish from the shore or from the water, as there is a boat launch, but only self-propelled and electric motor boats are allowed.  Swimming is also allowed at the lake but there is no life guard on duty.  

    Keechelus Lake
    Located over Snoqualmie Pass, Keechelus Lake is a great place for fishing.  The lake is stocked with various types of fish and also has a boat launch.  Near the lake there are also several camp grounds, making it convenient to fish and stay.  The lake is located in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National forest, so you will need a Northwest Forest Pass. 

    Kachess Lake
    Also located over Snoqualmie Pass, Kachess Lake offers another place to fish, swim and boat.  The lake is stocked with various species of fish and has a boat launch for water access fishing.  Camping and winter recreation is also available here.  The lake is located in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National forest, so you will need a Northwest Forest Pass. 

    Lake Margaret
    About five miles northeast of Duvall, Lake Margret is a perfect lake for fishing.  Public fishing access is on the south end of the lake and has plenty of space for bank fishing, or a boat launch if you prefer to fish from the water.  Fishing season is from the last Saturday in April through October. 

     

    Rivers

     

    Snoqualmie River
    The Snoqualmie River is comprised of three sections, the North Fork, Middle Fork and South Fork.  Due to Snoqualmie Falls, there are no anadromous fish up stream, but there are still native fish, such as the rainbow and westslope cutthroat.  Fishing is generally best along the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River.  Downstream from the falls, there is also walking access from the road (Fall City-Snoqualmie Road) for fishing.  The river is fast and swimming is recommended in designated areas. 
    Three Forks Natural Area: Located off of Reinig Rd, near where Reinig Road meets 428th Ave, the Three Forks Natural Area is a great place to gain access to the Snoqualmie River.  It has a parking lot and a small trail down to the river.  Please be careful swimming though, as the river is swift and there are no life guards on duty.
    Riverfront Park: The park provides additional opportunities to fish and swim along the south fork of the Snoqualmie River. 
    Si View Neighborhood Park: Provides further river access.  The park is located in the Si View subdivision and the water access is on top of the flood levee. 

    Denny Creek
    Denny Creek is a hiking trail, but there also is water access from the parking lot.  If you want to do the hike and swim, it’s a perfect opportunity.  The creek is cold and swift, so watch children to avoid hypothermia and drowning.  Denny Creek is off I-90, exit 47.  There is also camping nearby at the Denny Creek Campground.  You will need a Northwest Forest Pass to park.  

    Tolt River
    The Tolt River joins the Snoqualmie River in Carnation.  Along the river there are several places to fish and swim.
    Tolt-MacDonald Park: The park has river access but also contains ball fields, picnic areas, camping area and a 500 foot suspension bridge.  During the fall, the bridge is a great place to watch salmon spawning. 
    Lower Tolt River Boat Launch: There is also a boat launch into the Tolt River near the Tolt Hill Road Bridge.  Vehicle use permits are required and fishing rules vary by season.  

    Raging River
    The Raging River is another tributary to the Snoqualmie River.  Access to this river is gained by turning off the Preston-Snoqualmie River onto SE 44th PL.  River access is about .5 miles down the road on the left.  While there is a boat launch (in which motorized boats are allowed) there are no restrooms or other facilities. 

     

  • River Recreation - Kayaking

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Rivers are inherently dangerous places to recreate. The water can be high, swift and cold as mountain snowpack melts, making staying in control and hypothermia real risks. Logs and rocks, both visible and hidden, pose navigation hazards. Rivers are dynamic systems that change constantly. YOU choose to recreate in rivers at your own RISK.

    Before kayaking on these local rivers familiarize yourself with river conditions and river safety. Here are some resources to utilize:

     

    Raging River

    Preston to Fall City

    Difficulty:  Class 3+ (Difficult)

    Location: Raging River, Preston to Fall City section

    Length: 5 miles

    This section of whitewater has particularly beautiful scenery of Washington and a nice current to carry you along. However, this is not a stretch of whitewater for beginners, keep in mind that Washington Rivers are more challenging than most rivers in the U.S. to kayak, so do so at your own risk.

     

    Snoqualmie River:

    Snoqualmie Falls to Plum’s Landing

    Difficulty: Class 2+ (Difficult)

    Location: Snoqualmie River, Snoqualmie Falls to Plum’s Landing

    Length: 1 mile

    Snoqualmie Falls to Plum’s Landing is a beautiful section of the Snoqualmie River and the sun sparkling off the water will have you returning again and again to paddle along this amazing stretch of whitewater. This section of Snoqualmie River is 1 miles long and it is classified as a class II+ section by American Whitewater, so do not kayak this section of river if you are a beginner. Kayak at your own risk.

     

    Middle Fork: Tanner to North Bend Stretch

    Difficulty: Class 2 (Easy)

    Location: Snoqualmie River, Middle Fork: Tanner to North Bend Stretch

    Length: 4.5 miles

    The Middle Fork, Tanner to North Bend stretch of the Snoqualmie River boasts beautiful views of the Northern Cascade Range and the water moves in a way that attracts paddlers from all over. Though this section of river is classified as Class 2 and considered easy, whitewater rafting and kayaking is more difficult in Washington than other states, so you might find it more demanding than usual. Kayak at your own risk. NOTE: There are two different spots on the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, one of them is significantly more difficult so make sure you have the Tanner to North Bend section before you begin rafting or kayaking.

     

    Middle Fork: Concrete Bridge to Tanner Stretch

    Difficulty: Class 3/4 (Difficult)

    Location: Snoqualmie River, Middle Fork: Concrete Bridge to Tanner Stretch

    Length: 7 Miles

    The Middle Fork section of the Snoqualmie River winds through the Northern Cascade Range, so the breathtaking scenery will have you coming back for more. This section of the Snoqualmie River is classified as class 3/4 difficulty and is about 7 miles, so it is very strenuous and should be paddled only by experienced kayakers. Kayak at your own risk.

     

    South Fork: Twin Falls State Park to 436 St Bridge section

    Difficulty: Class 2 (Easy)

    Location: Snoqualmie River, South Fork: Twin Falls State Park to 436 St Bridge section

    Length: 5 miles

    The South Fork of the Snoqualmie River has wonderful scenery of King County and the Northern Cascade Range. This is a perfect stretch for an afternoon of paddling. Even though this section of river is classified as Class 2 and considered easy, whitewater rafting and kayaking is more difficult in Washington than other states, so you might find it more demanding than usual. Kayak at your own risk.

     

    North Fork: Big Creek to Spur 10 Bridge section

    Difficulty: Class 3 (Difficult)

    Location: Snoqualmie River, South Fork: Big Creek to Spur 10 Bridge section

    Length: 6.3 miles

    The North Fork of the Snoqualmie River has wonderful scenery of King County and the Northern Cascade Range, as well as a playful water current to keep you entertained. This section of the Snoqualmie River is classified as class 3 difficulty and is 6.3 miles, so it is very strenuous and should be paddled only by experienced kayakers. Kayak at your own risk. NOTE: There are two different spots on the North Fork of the Snoqualmie River, one of them is significantly more difficult so make sure you have the Big Creek to Spur 10 Bridge section before you begin rafting or kayaking.

     

    North Fork: Spur 10 Bridge to 428th St. Bridge section

    Difficulty: Class 5+ (Extremely Difficult)

    Location: Snoqualmie River, North Fork: Spur 10 Bridge to 428th St. Bridge section

    Length: 6.5 miles

    This particular stretch of the Snoqualmie River is perfect for spending time outdoors and getting some good exercise in. North Fork gives you great views of the Northern Cascade Range and beautiful King County scenery. This section of the Snoqualmie River is classified as class 5+ difficulty and is 6.5 miles, so it is extremely strenuous and should be paddled only by very experienced expert kayakers. Kayak at your own risk.

     

    Tolt River

    Tolt River: Tolt River Road close to Carnation to Snoqualmie River section

    Difficulty: Class 2

    Location: Tolt River, Tolt River Road close to Carnation to Snoqualmie River section

    Length: 5.7 miles

    From the Tolt River you have beautiful views of the surrounding area and the Northern Cascade Range. This section of the river is a good length and would be perfect for spending the day out in nature. Even though this section of the river is classified as Class2, whitewater rafting and kayaking is more difficult in Washington than other states, so you might find it more demanding than usual. Kayak at your own risk. NOTE: There are a couple different spots on the Tolt River for Kayaking; some are significantly more difficult so make sure you have the Tolt River Road close to Carnation to Snoqualmie River section.

     

    Tolt River: North Fork

    Difficulty: Class 4/5+ (extremely difficult)

    Location: Tolt River, North Fork (Yellow Creek to South Fork Tolt section)

    Length: 7 miles

    From the Tolt River you have beautiful views of the surrounding area and the Northern Cascade Range. This section of the river is a good length and would be perfect for spending the day out in nature. This section of the Tolt River is classified as class 4/5+ difficulty and is 7 miles, so it is extremely strenuous and should be paddled only by very experienced expert kayakers. Kayak at your own risk.

     

    Tolt River: South Fork

    Difficulty: Class 5 (Extremely Difficult)

    Location: Bridge to confluence with North Fork Tolt section

    Length: 5.9 miles

    From the Tolt River you have beautiful views of the surrounding area and the Northern Cascade Range. This section of the river is a good length and would be perfect for spending the day out in nature. This section of the Tolt River is classified as class 4/5+ difficulty and is 5.9 miles, so it is extremely strenuous and should be paddled only by very experienced expert kayakers. Kayak at your own risk.